Thank you for sharing this page.


  
 Paleis

EUREQA Final Event


Together with the launch of the project publication "EUREQA Moments! Top tips for quality assurance", the event will present the lessons learnt over the past three years and share examples of good practice in developing internal quality assurance.
EUA_Eureqa_RGB

Hosted at the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts, Brussels, Belgium

3 September 2015

  • Since 2012 EUA has been coordinating the EUREQA project ("Empowering universities to fulfil their responsibilities for quality assurance").

    This event marks the culmination of three years of capacity building activities. During this time, EUA and EU project partners have supported universities in Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo in developing their internal QA systems in a way that is adapted to different national and institutional contexts.

    Together with the launch of the project publication "EUREQA Moments! Top tips for quality assurance", the event will present the lessons learnt over the past three years and share examples of good practice in developing internal quality assurance. Participants will also have an opportunity to hear the findings of a new EUA occasional paper, which will give an insight into current trends in internal QA in Europe, particularly in relation to the revised ESG.

    Further details about the project rationale, activities and partners can be found here.

    Hosted at  

    logo_royal flemish academy

    With the support of the Tempus programme of the European Union

     eu_flag_tempus small
  • About The Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Sciences and the Arts

     PaleisThe first academy in Belgium was founded in 1772 by Empress Maria Theresa of Austria. The Imperial and Royal Academy of Sciences and Letters of Brussels was the imperial power's instrument for organising and controlling intellectual life in the Austrian Low Countries. This institution did not survive the French occupation of the Belgian regions. William I, king of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands since 1815, reinstated the academy in 1816. It found its permanent place in the social order only after Belgium had become independent in 1830. In 1845 it acquired the title Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres, et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, and it was divided into three classes: science, humanities, and fine arts.

    From its independence onward, Belgium was officially bilingual (Dutch/French), although French was preponderant in higher education. Therefore, the academy was primarily a French-speaking institution. Gradually, however, Dutch acquired an importance approaching that of French. In Flanders - the northern part of Belgium -, Dutch replaced French in higher education in the 1930s. The logical outcome was the creation in 1938 of the Dutch-language Koninklijke Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schone Kunsten van België (Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Sciences and Arts). From then on the academy's function was to encourage science and arts in the Flemish part of the country, while the Académie Royale continued to fulfil the same function in the French-speaking part of the country.

    The early years of the new academy were not favourable since the outbreak of World War II put a brake on its activities. In 1945, however, a proper start could be made towards achieving its aims in the service of the Flemish community in Belgium. In 1988 the golden jubilee of the academy commemorated half a century of intellectual activity. This was expressed in more than 1,500 publications, in the organisation of many colloquia, and in the activities of its working committees.

    Activities and Goals

    The Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Sciences and Arts (KVAB) promotespaleis_marmer interuniversity cooperation in Belgium. In that sense the distance between the universities is very favourable as almost all Flemish universities lie at a distance of no more than 80 kilometres of each other. This in itself is already a lever for interuniversity cooperation. Moreover, the KVAB stimulates professors of the different universities in getting to know each other, and above all tries to motivate the young researchers.

European University Association (EUA)

Brussels office:
Avenue de l’Yser, 24
1040 Brussels
Belgium
Tel: +32 (0) 2 230 55 44

Geneva office:
114, Rue du Rhône
Case postale 3174
1211 Geneva 3
Switzerland
Tel: +41 22 552 02 96