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Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, is located in the northern part of the country on the coast of the Baltic Sea. Due to its auspicious geographical location Tallinn has been a meeting point of the trading routes between east and west throughout its history. Finno-Ugric people settled in the Tallinn area more than 3500 years ago. In 1154 an Arabian geographer named al-Idrisi marked Tallinn on his world map.

In the beginning of 13th century Danish king Waldemar II conquered Tallinn and was followed by Swedish, German and Russian rulers. All of them influenced Tallinn’s architectural history which can be seen today in Tallinn’s compact and well preserved Old Town. It is unique in Northern Europe and has a place on UNESCO’s World Heritage list.

To this day, romantic cobblestone streets, the two-kilometre long old city wall with its twenty-six defence towers, churches and convents, the oldest apothecary still running in the world, passages, courtyards and imposing merchants’ dwellings all give a truly medieval feel to the Old Town.

But not only the Old Town is well worth a visit. The simple, sleek designs of recent buildings of the Tallinn ”City“ represent the modern face of the town with its state-of-the-art office buildings, banks, high quality hotels, conference centres, etc.

The population of Tallinn is around 400 000. The local language is Estonian, which is a Finno-Ugric language and closely related to Finnish. Foreign languages such as Russian, English and Finnish are widely spoken.

Tallinn’s culture has an affinity to both Scandinavian and German aesthetics and customs, but is also drawing on influences from the Slavic world.

The city’s cultural life is young, lively, open and innovative and it is possible to spend hours exploring the numerous galleries and museums of Tallinn.

 

European University Association (EUA)

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